Jersey Joe Walcott

 

About Jersey Joe Walcott

Arnold Raymond Cream (January 31, 1914 – February 25, 1994), best known as Jersey Joe Walcott, was an American professional boxer who competed from 1930 to 1953. He held the world heavyweight title from 1951 to 1952, and broke the record for the oldest man to win the title, at the age of 37. That record would eventually be broken in 1994 by 45-year-old George Foreman.

After retiring from boxing, Walcott did some acting, playing small parts in a few movies and television shows. He also refereed several boxing matches, but after the controversial ending to the second fight between Muhammad Ali and Sonny Liston, Walcott was not asked to referee again. From 1971 to 1974, Walcott held the elected position of Sheriff of Camden County, New Jersey, the first African-American to do so. From 1975 to 1984, he was the chairman of the New Jersey State Athletic Commission.

 

 

About the Artist: Carl LeVotch

As a guy born and reared in East Camden (son of an artist and athlete who played football at Woodrow Wilson in the 30’s), and a boxing aficionado/gym rat who has sparred with contenders and champions, I’m excited to have this opportunity to honor and commemorate Camden’s favorite son, Heavyweight Champion Jersey Joe Walcott (Arnold Cream).

Having to date been privileged to create five awards for the Boxing Writers Association of America and numerous other artworks on the sport, including a 7ft sculpture of Middleweight Champion Joey Giardello (Passyunk Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa), I view this present commission as a culmination of my lifelong passion for art, Camden and the sport of boxing.

I am proposing to create an 8ft bronze figure sculpture, two bronze high relief sculptures, and a bronze replica of The Champion’s ring belt. These works of art will be affixed to a pedestal/base, and the entire monument will be placed permanently on the promenade at Wiggins Park, Camden, New Jersey.

My goal is to create a magnificent work of art that will become a magnet and an inspiration worthy of Jersey Joe Walcott and the City of Camden.

In addition, I look forward to extending an invitation to the students of the community to experience the development of this meaningful work of art; through scheduled visits to my studio during the development stages of the sculptures. The studio will also be open to periodic fundraising receptions.

More about the artist: https://tss.ib.tv/boxing/featured-boxing-articles-boxing-news-videos-rankings-and-results/28488-carl-levotch-renowned-boxing-statuary-big-plans-next-project

 

Video Gallery

Honoring Jersey Joe Walcott  with Vincent Cream, Jersey Joe Walcott Statue Committee

A New Jersey Boxing Legend with Larry Hazzard, Sr. of the Jersey Joe Walcott Statue Committee

 

Press and Media

Courier Post (coming soon)

Philadelphia Inquirer

 

Battle on the Battleship – September 27th

 In partnership with the Camden County Historical Society, the Freeholder Board is honoring Camden native and boxing legend Arnold “Jersey Joe Walcott” Cream with an eight-foot statue in Wiggins Park along the Camden Waterfront.

“Jersey Joe’s legacy as a professional boxer and world-class athlete is of historical significance, but it’s his iconography in the region that really motivates this project,” said Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli, Jr. “Jersey Joe was born and raised in Camden City, and he was a hero and an inspiration to people throughout our area.”

Joe Walcott was an American professional boxer who competed from 1930 to 1953. He held the world heavyweight title from 1951 to 1952 and broke the record for the oldest man to win the title, at the age of 37. That record would eventually be broken in 1994 by 45-year-old George Foreman.

After retiring from boxing, Walcott did some acting, playing small parts in a few movies and television shows. From 1971 to 1974, Walcott held the elected position of Sheriff of Camden County, the first African-American to do so. From 1975 to 1984, he was the chairman of the New Jersey State Athletic Commission.

“Both in his athletic career and as a public servant, he spent his life breaking barriers and redefining success,” Cappelli said. “We think it’s important not only to honor him for his contributions to this community, but to ensure that his legacy continues to inspire others for a very long time.”

The tribute is to be created by local sculptor, Carl LeVotch. His design includes an eight-foot bronze figure sculpture with two bronze high relief sculptures, and a bronze replica of The Champion’s ring belt. These works of art will be affixed to a pedestal/base, and the entire monument will be placed permanently on the promenade at Wiggins Park. Work is expected to begin on the artwork by mid-to-late September, with a timeline for completion around Fall 2021.

Battle on the Battleship, September 27, 2019

See All Event Photos Here

 

 

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